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The Dresher Center is Pleased to Announce
“The Inclusion Imperative”

“The Inclusion Imperative,” a major new initiative supporting diversity and inclusion in the humanities, has been awarded a five-year grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. We’re looking forward to the opportunity to partner with UMBC faculty, community organizations, and other area universities to begin these programs.
Read more about “The Inclusion Imperative” here: http://bit.ly/2ptzcu5


Spring 2017 Residential Faculty Research Fellows

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Calla Thompson, Associate Professor, Visual Arts
Project: The Velvet Fist: Lesbian and Gay Liberation in 1981 Toronto

                  

 

 

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Constantine Vaporis, Director, Asian Studies Program, and Professor, History
Project: Sword and Brush: Portraits of Samurai Life in Early Modern Japan, 1600-1868

 

 


Announcing our 2017 Summer Faculty Research Fellows:

Nicole King, Chair and Associate Professor, American Studies: “Baltimore Revisited: Rethinking and Remaking a Right to the City”
Michele Osherow, Associate Professor, English: “Keeping the Girls in Stitches: Embroidering Biblical Narrative in the Seventeenth Century”
Meredith Oyen, Associate Professor, History: “Shanghai Survivors: World War Two’s Displaced Persons in Asia and the International Politics of Refugee Resettlement”

 


 

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“Baltimore Stories” concludes a year of community programs exploring identity through narrative

Over 100 humanities scholars, cultural organizers, educators, young people, and others convened at UMBC in December to discuss their efforts over the past year to help amplify the voices of Baltimore communities and use narrative to move towards change. “Reflecting on Baltimore Stories” was the culmination of a year-long series of public programs examining how stories of and about Baltimore influence the lives of its people. UMBC’s Dresher Center for the Humanities hosted the day-long event that considered what is changing in stories of identity in the city and what these changes mean for the future of Baltimore.

The Baltimore Stories project has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, and is a collaboration between the University of Maryland; Maryland Humanities; the University of Maryland, Baltimore County; Enoch Pratt Free Library; and the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance.

Read more about the event here and in The Baltimore Sun

“Reflecting on Baltimore Stories” event agenda

Learn about UMBC’s Baltimore Stories grant