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Visiting Faculty Fellowship Program

Accepting Applications for 2019-2020
Visiting Faculty Fellows

Applications open on November 1, 2018 and close on January 15, 2019.

The Dresher Center for the Humanities at UMBC invites applications for Visiting Faculty Fellowships as part of its Inclusion Imperative Program. Funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Inclusion Imperative is a five-year initiative to support diversity and inclusion in humanities scholarship and curriculum. Applications are welcome from full-time faculty pursuing humanities research at colleges and universities in Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia.

Fellowships will be awarded to scholars who are committed to diversity in the academy and to the advancement of groups historically underrepresented in the professoriate. Fellows will spend one semester or one academic year advancing their research while in residence at the Dresher Center. The Dresher Center provides research support and collegial conversation in a robust humanities center environment that includes public events and symposia, grants workshops, works-in-progress talks, internal residential faculty research fellowships, and graduate student fellowships.

Faculty will be in residence at the Dresher Center for the Humanities at UMBC for a period of either one semester or one academic year and will receive a salary support stipend of up to $50,000 (one year) or $25,000 (one semester). They will have access to an office and to administrative and research development services in the Dresher Center, as well as to the Albin O. Kuhn Library and other UMBC events and facilities. This regional program does not provide funds for housing and transportation; however, each fellow will receive funding support of up to $2,500 for research and travel-related expenses.

Access the online application here.

Questions: inclusionimperative@umbc.edu



Inclusion Imperative Visiting Faculty Fellows for 2018-2019

Dr. Katherine Bankole-Medina (left), Professor of History at Coppin State University, and
Dr. Theresa Runstedtler (right), Associate Professor of History at American University, have each been awarded a full academic year fellowship to advance their research while in residence at the Dresher Center.

Dr. Bankole-Medina’s project, “African Americans as Specimens, Objects, and Agents: Race and Clinical Care in the Maryland Medical Journal, 1877-1918,” is a 40-year account of the lives of African Americans, drawn from the Maryland Medical Journal. Her UMBC faculty collaborator is Dr. Shawn Bediako, Associate Professor of Psychology and Coordinator of UMBC’s Collaborative for the Interdisciplinary Promotion of Health Equity Research (CIPHER).

Dr. Runstedtler’s project, “Black Ball: Rethinking the ‘Dark Ages’ of Professional Basketball,” explores the intersection of blackness, masculinity, labor, and criminalization through the lens of 1970s professional basketball. Her UMBC faculty collaborator is Dr. Nicole King, Associate Professor and Chair of American Studies.

The Visiting Fellows join a robust humanities center environment that includes public events and symposia, grants workshops, works-in-progress talks, internal residential faculty research fellowships, and graduate student fellowships. Each Visiting Fellow is collaborating with a UMBC faculty member with shared research or teaching interests to broaden and deepen the exchange between fellows and the campus community.

The Inclusion Imperative is a major five-year initiative to promote diversity and inclusive excellence in the humanities, made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. UMBC, in partnership with Bowie State University, Coppin State University, and Howard University, is cultivating a regional network of scholars, who are committed to diversity and inclusion in the humanities. These fundamental partnerships guide the Inclusion Imperative’s three programs: the Visiting Faculty Fellowship Program, the Diversity Teaching Network in the Humanities, and the Humanities Teaching Labs. Through these programs, the Inclusion Imperative supports and expands community-engaged humanities research, teaching, and learning focused on issues of equity, inclusion, and justice.


 

The Inclusion Imperative is made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.