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Spring 2018 Humanities Forum

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22

4 p.m., Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Attunement: How We Become Enthralled by Art
Rita Felski, Professor of English, University of Virginia

Reading the opening lines of a novel, coming face to face with a painting, or listening to a few bars of music we may find ourselves captivated or entranced in ways we cannot always explain. We are enthralled by what we did not think we would care for; or we are left cold by what we were eagerly anticipating. This talk will explore why are we drawn to certain artworks – become “attuned” to them – but are stubbornly unmoved by others. It will consider various examples of attunement, both sudden and slow, with a particular focus on Zadie Smith’s response to the music of Joni Mitchell.

Sponsored by the Dresher Center for the Humanities, the American Studies Department, and the English Department.

 

THURSDAY, MARCH 1

4 p.m., Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Media and Communication Studies 10th Anniversary Event

Listening to Racism in the United States – or Why Sound Matters
Jennifer Lynn Stoever, Associate Professor of English, State University of New York at Binghamton

We talk too often about race and racism as if they are solely visual concepts. Jennifer Stoever’s lecture will unsettle the assumed relationship between race and looking by introducing the concept of the sonic color line and exploring the often undetected ways in which sound and listening have also functioned to produce and enforce racial hierarchies throughout U.S. history and in our present moment. Stoever argues that sound matters in our everyday lives and that we can work to shift our historically and culturally conditioned listening practices toward a more equitable world.

Sponsored by the Media and Communication Studies Department; the College of Arts, Sciences, and Humanities; the Dresher Center for the Humanities; the Africana Studies Department; and the English Department.

 

THURSDAY, MARCH 8

4 p.m., Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

11th Annual Korenman Lecture

Becoming Bridge-Builders and Disrupters: Navigating Racial and Gender Realities in America Today

Deepa Iyer, South Asian American activist, writer, and lawyer

America is becoming a nation in which communities of color will comprise the majority population by 2040. In her talk, Deepa Iyer, a racial justice advocate and writer, will explore the racial realities affecting people of color, women, and immigrants and refugees in America today. She will share stories of struggle and resistance from communities affected by backlash, xenophobia and Islamophobia. Iyer will provide ideas for maintaining equitable and inclusive policies and institutions that reflect the racial realities and intersectional identities of communities in America.

Sponsored by the Gender + Women’s Studies Department; the Dresher Center for the Humanities; the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences; the Office of the Provost; Student Life’s Mosaic Center; the Global Studies Program; the Media and Communication Studies Department; the Modern Languages, Linguistics, and Intercultural Communication Department; the Africana Studies Department; and the Asian Studies Program.

 

FOCUS ON GENTRIFICATION IN BALTIMORE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11  

7 p.m., Performing Arts and Humanities Building, Room 132

Flickering Treasures: Rediscovering Baltimore’s Forgotten Movie Theaters
Amy Davis, author and Baltimore Sun photojournalist

Author and Baltimore Sun photojournalist Amy Davis presents a slide show and discussion on Flickering Treasures: Rediscovering Baltimore’s Forgotten Movie Theaters. A fresh story of Baltimore emerges through the social, cultural and architectural prism of its movie theaters. Rare vintage photos, combined with Davis’s evocative color photography and poignant reminiscences, bring a century of movie-going to life.

Sponsored by the Dresher Center for the Humanities, the English Department, and the Visual Arts Department.

 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18  

4 p.m., Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Redevelopment and Justice in Baltimore

Lawrence Brown, Associate Professor, School of Community Health and Policy, Morgan State University
Felipe Filomeno, Assistant Professor, Political Science, UMBC
Seema D. Iyer, Associate Director and Research Assistant Professor, Baltimore Neighborhood Indicators Alliance, The Jacob France Institute
Nicole King, Chair and Associate Professor, American Studies, UMBC

 Gentrification has long been a watchword for neighborhoods facing redevelopment and the many social and economic changes it brings.  How can Baltimore neighborhoods renew themselves without forcing out local residents or homogenizing diverse populations? This expert panel will focus on key questions linking gentrification and social justice, from the reasons why black neighborhoods and immigrants matter to the role of arts and entertainment districts in the process of redevelopment.  Attention will be paid to the Vital Signs report, issued by the Baltimore Neighborhood Indicators Alliance, which provides data on quality of life in Baltimore communities.

Sponsored by the Dresher Center for the Humanities, the American Studies Department, and the Political Science Department.

 

THURSDAY, MAY 3

4 p.m., Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

Planned Parenthood In Maryland: A Vital Community Resource
Carole McCann, Professor and Chair, Gender + Women’s Studies, UMBC

The talk will highlight Carole McCann’s project about Planned Parenthood of Maryland (PPM), which marked its 90th anniversary in 2017. Working with local archives and PPM, McCann is reconstructing the history of the staff and community members whose efforts in the mid-twentieth century made PPM a respected public health organization and a vital affiliate in the national Planned Parenthood Federation.

Sponsored by the Gender + Women’s Studies Department; the College of Arts, Sciences, and Humanities; the Dresher Center for the Humanities; and the Social Sciences Forum.